Silver And Gold

The Illusion of Explanatory Depth
For years I have calmly, patiently, and for the most part rationally, listened to friends, family, patients, and colleagues grapple with the notion of precious metals.
The majority understand the basic reasons why some portion of portfolio allocation is necessary or prudent, but very few have (or will) taken action.
Often, people are shocked that I would be interested in the matter to begin with. I think subconsciously people understand to be a �Doctor� is to be a teacher, but on the surface most people find it odd and uncomfortable to accept my interest and quest in something that rarely occurs to them.
Occasionally, there will be debate. I don’t necessarily look for them. Experience with humans of all ages and from all walks of life has afforded me a healthy dose of humility. But I’m happy and proud to go as far as anyone would like about money, finance and especially silver.
No matter how tempting it is, no matter how strong the need is to be right and to feel vindicated, it is normally fruitless. I don’t know where I first heard it, but one of my favorite expressions has become:
�I can explain it to you, but I can’t understand it for you.�
Understanding requires a shift. One that, I feel myself almost cringing to admit, involves emotional intelligence. This goes against all rational logic.
Most people are polite. And I’ll admit to a tendency for avoiding conflict �” especially given the context in which many of these (potential) debates typically arise.
I came across the following article by accident some time back. It immediately resonated with my own experience in wrestling with my own beliefs, but also the beliefs, world views, and opinions of people I care about.
And collectively speaking, the opinions and views of anyone with a pulse who cares about financial safety, justice, and wealth.
You are, I’m afraid to say, mistaken. The position you are taking makes no logical sense. Just listen up and I’ll be more than happy to elaborate on the many, many reasons why I’m right and you are wrong. Are you feeling ready to be convinced?
Whether the subject is climate engineering, the Middle East or forthcoming holiday plans, this is the approach many of us adopt when we try to convince others to change their minds. It’s also an approach that, more often than not, leads to the person on the receiving end hardening their existing position.
(Ed. For the subject of money and wealth, at the root lies the fear of loss � more powerful than the want of profit. People will do anything, and convince themselves of practically anything, to avoid loss.)
Fortunately, research suggests there is a better way � one that involves more listening and less trying to bludgeon your opponent into submission.